Webinars

Unseen Poetry

Improve your knowledge of Unseen Poetry and develop excellent exam technique for AQA GCSE English Literature.

The Unseen Poetry questions account for 20% of the total exam grade so regular learning and revision, including timed answer practice, is vital.

This webinar series is ideal for GCSE students needing a boost and for pre-GCSE students looking for a head start.

Can’t make the live time? Register and receive access to recordings to view in your own time.

Fridays 5pm UK time. Starts Jan 7th 2022. £6 per webinar, payable termly.

Macbeth

Improve your knowledge of Macbeth and develop excellent exam technique for AQA GCSE English Literature.

The Macbeth essay accounts for 21% of the total exam grade so regular learning and revision, including timed essay practice, is vital.

This webinar series is ideal for GCSE students needing a boost and for pre-GCSE students looking for a head start.

Can’t make the live time? Register and receive access to recordings to view in your own time.

Mondays 4:30pm UK time. Starts Jan 10th 2022. £6 per webinar, payable termly.

Unseen Reading

Improve your marks in AQA GCSE English Language Paper 1 Section A and Paper 2 Section A unseen reading.

Assessment of unseen reading accounts for 50% of the total exam grade so regular unseen reading, including timed practice, is vital.

This webinar series is ideal for GCSE students needing a boost and for pre-GCSE students looking for a head start.

Can’t make the live time? Register and receive access to recordings to view in your own time.

Fridays 4:30pm UK time. Starts Jan 7th 2022. £6 per webinar, payable termly.

Writing for English Language

Improve your creative and non-fiction writing for GCSE and IGCSE English Language.

Assessment of these genres accounts for up to 50% of the total exam grade so regular writing, including timed practice, is vital.

This webinar series is ideal for GCSE and IGCSE students needing a boost and for pre-GCSE students looking for a head start.

Can’t make the live time? Register and receive access to recordings to view in your own time.

Mondays 5:30pm UK time. Starts Jan 10th 2022. £6 per webinar, payable termly.

Model Answers

Creative Story Writing

This book is ideal for helping students improve their creative story writing for the GCSE English Language exams. Each chapter contains an exam task, a planning checklist and a model story to help students understand what a good exam story looks like. From only £4.99.

Non-Fiction Writing

This book is ideal for helping students improve their non-fiction writing for the GCSE English Language exams. Each chapter contains an exam task, a planning checklist and a model text to help students understand what a good exam answer looks like. From only £4.99.

Description Writing

This book is ideal for helping students improve their description writing for the GCSE English Language exams. Each chapter contains an exam task, a planning checklist and a model description to help students understand what a good exam answer looks like. From only £4.99.

Updates

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20 hours ago
GCSE English.uk

Romeo and Juliet key quotations

The prologue sets the scene in Verona, a city in Northern Italy. This period in Italian history, during which time the source texts for Romeo and Juliet first emerged, was very turbulent. The Italian Wars wracked the peninsular from 1494 to 1559, and Italy became the primary battleground for supremacy among competing European powers. Italy was fragmented and contested and cities were often battlegrounds as powerful families on opposing sides battled for control.

In this chaos, the vendetta was common (despite attempts to outlaw it) and the "ancient grudge" never fully disappeared as every new generation found a reason to "mutiny". After all, being on the winning side of a vendetta meant not only was your family honour saved but also you controlled a wealthy city and perhaps could gain the backing of one of the European powers and therefore access to more wealth and power. This is high politics, warfare, greed and family honour all wrapped up into a dangerous mix of violence and anger.

England, by comparison, was experiencing a relatively peaceful period between the Wars of the Roses (1455-1487) and the Civil War (1642-1651). For many of the original audience, the chaos of Italy would have been something horrifying but, luckily, far away; something to be experienced via plays but never for real. After all, few of the original audience would have been to Italy (barring, possibly, a small number of returned soldiers) and Shakespeare almost certainly never travelled there.

Note: the key source text for Romeo and Juliet was Luigi da Porto's adaptation of a widely-retold story into his novel Giulietta e Romeo in 1524 (published posthumously in 1531 in Venice). Shakespeare would have read the story in English in Arthur Brooke's 1562 narrative poem The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet which was a translation and adaptation of a French version of another Italian version of Da Porto's version (!).

All quotations and act, scene, line and page references from the Oxford School Shakespeare edition:

#gcseenglishliterature #romeoandjuliet
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Romeo and Juliet key quotations  The prologue sets the scene in Verona, a city in Northern Italy. This period in Italian history, during which time the source texts for Romeo and Juliet first emerged, was very turbulent. The Italian Wars wracked the peninsular from 1494 to 1559, and  Italy became the primary battleground for supremacy among competing European powers. Italy was fragmented and contested and cities were often battlegrounds as powerful families on opposing sides battled for control.  In this chaos, the vendetta was common (despite attempts to outlaw it) and the ancient grudge never fully disappeared as every new generation found a reason to mutiny. After all, being on the winning side of a vendetta meant not only was your family honour saved but also you controlled a wealthy city and perhaps could gain the backing of one of the European powers and therefore access to more wealth and power. This is high politics, warfare, greed and family honour all wrapped up into a dangerous mix of violence and anger.  England, by comparison, was experiencing a relatively peaceful period between the Wars of the Roses (1455-1487) and the Civil War (1642-1651). For many of the original audience, the chaos of Italy would have been something horrifying but, luckily, far away; something to be experienced via plays but never for real. After all, few of the original audience would have been to Italy (barring, possibly, a small number of returned soldiers) and Shakespeare almost certainly never travelled there.  Note: the key source text for Romeo and Juliet was Luigi da Portos adaptation of a widely-retold story into his novel Giulietta e Romeo in 1524 (published posthumously in 1531 in Venice). Shakespeare would have read the story in English in Arthur Brookes 1562 narrative poem The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet which was a translation and adaptation of a French version of another Italian version of Da Portos version (!).  All quotations and act, scene, line and page references from the Oxford School Shakespeare edition: https://amzn.to/3CYXall  #gcseenglishliterature #romeoandjuliet
4 days ago
GCSE English.uk

Macbeth essay model answers available to pre-order now:

Macbeth key quotations

The fact that the Witches open the play, rather than a scene with Macbeth the victorious soldier, creates a powerful sense of foreboding. Their trochaic rhythms, their grotesque appearance, the "filthy" (1.1.13) fog and their conversation with invisible spirits Graymalkin and Paddock, are "weïrd" (1.3.30) indeed. Nothing about them suggests that the person they plan to meet, Macbeth, will benefit from the encounter.

The paradox "fair is foul, and foul is fair" (1.1.12) neatly encapsulates the "hurly-burly" (1.1.3), topsy-turvy world of the play where good people will be murdered and bad people will thrive – for a while at least.

All quotations and act, scene, line and page references from the Oxford School Shakespeare edition:

#gcseenglishliterature #macbeth
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Macbeth essay model answers available to pre-order now: https://amzn.to/3nmUbig  Macbeth key quotations  The fact that the Witches open the play, rather than a scene with Macbeth the victorious soldier, creates a powerful sense of foreboding. Their trochaic rhythms,  their grotesque appearance, the filthy (1.1.13) fog and their conversation with invisible spirits Graymalkin and Paddock, are weïrd (1.3.30) indeed. Nothing about them suggests that the person they plan to meet, Macbeth, will benefit from the encounter.  The paradox fair is foul, and foul is fair (1.1.12) neatly encapsulates the hurly-burly (1.1.3), topsy-turvy world of the play where good people will be murdered and bad people will thrive – for a while at least.  All quotations and act, scene, line and page references from the Oxford School Shakespeare edition: https://amzn.to/3rbYYoW  #gcseenglishliterature #macbeth
5 days ago
GCSE English.uk

Revision Top Tip

Read the books!!! They aren't that long. See below for estimated reading times.

Clearly, reading is not simply about total words read; you also need to understand the texts which, of course, takes more effort. However, don't put off sitting down to read the books again because you think you don't have enough time. You probably do. They are short texts.

It's almost as if schools purposefully choose short texts for the GCSE 🤔🤔🤔

Estimated reading time for average readers reading at 200 words per minute (Note: you will not need to read all of these! Choose the four texts you have studied from the options below.)

Macbeth: 1hr 25mins
Romeo and Juliet: 2hrs 02mins
Jekyll and Hyde: 2hrs 08mins
Christmas Carol: 2hrs 20mins
An Inspector Calls: 1hrs 46mins
Animal Farm: 2hrs 25mins
Lord of the Flies: 4hrs 59mins
Love and Relationships: 15mins
Power and Conflict: 19mins

I will be running revision and learning webinars on Macbeth and Unseen Poetry from Jan 2022. Sign up now!

Macbeth: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/…
Unseen Poetry: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/…

#gcseenglish #gcseenglishliterature
... Read moreClose

Revision Top Tip  Read the books!!! They arent that long. See below for estimated reading times.  Clearly, reading is not simply about total words read; you also need to understand the texts which, of course, takes more effort. However, dont put off sitting down to read the books again because you think you dont have enough time. You probably do. They are short texts.  Its almost as if schools purposefully choose short texts for the GCSE 🤔🤔🤔  Estimated reading time for average readers reading at 200 words per minute (Note: you will not need to read all of these! Choose the four texts you have studied from the options below.)  Macbeth: 1hr 25mins
Romeo and Juliet: 2hrs 02mins
Jekyll and Hyde: 2hrs 08mins
Christmas Carol: 2hrs 20mins
An Inspector Calls: 1hrs 46mins
Animal Farm: 2hrs 25mins
Lord of the Flies: 4hrs 59mins
Love and Relationships: 15mins
Power and Conflict: 19mins  I will be running revision and learning webinars on Macbeth and Unseen Poetry from Jan 2022. Sign up now!  Macbeth: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/7016330739068/WN_7VHlR_abQom8SqQ9ShoFTw
Unseen Poetry: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/2316330743489/WN_PTQoTSYpQU-heuvNhEpt9Q  #gcseenglish #gcseenglishliterature
6 days ago
GCSE English.uk

Revision Playlist Suggestion 🎼🎧🎹

Mock season is upon us and students often ask me for revision tips. Here they are: read the texts, do past papers, read my model answers.

Few ask me about music suggestions, which is a shame, as I have excellent taste. 🤔 Here's what I listened to whilst revising back in the 90s: Now 23. On cassette of course. Maybe it will work its magic for you?

https://youtube.com/watch/…

Model answers
Story:
Non-fiction:
Description:
Macbeth:
Now 23:

#gcseenglish #gcseenglishlanguage #gcseenglishliterature
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7 days ago
GCSE English.uk

Key quote from Jekyll and Hyde

Only in the second last chapter is Mr Hyde finally revealed as being the transformed Dr Jekyll. Here, a "revolting" (p39) visitor offers Lanyon a choice: either allow the visitor to leave with his potion and not know OR watch the visitor drink the potion and know.

The visitor offers Lanyon the gift of knowledge and, in an echo of Adam and Eve's choice, Lanyon accepts it, despite grave misgivings.

This quote is the moment the visitor drinks the potion. He taunts and mocks Lanyon for being so narrow-minded and incurious. The rhythmic tricolon and the imperative "behold" impart a Biblical tone to the visitor's manner. "Behold" is used 1298 times in the Authorised King James Version of the Bible and 135 times in the 1662 Book of Common Prayer (the versions that Stevenson and his audience would have been familiar with). It is a word then with clear religious connotations.

Coupled with the visitor's earlier statement that what Lanyon is about to see "will be a prodigy to stagger the unbelief of Satan" (p40) and blasphemous annotations found in a "pious work" (p34), we realise that this visitor is not just taunting Lanyon, he is taunting God.

Lanyon reveals at the end of the chapter what most readers have already deduced; the visitor is none other than Mr Hyde and, after taking the potions, he is transformed into Dr Jekyll. Finally, we know for sure who Mr Hyde really is.

Page reference from the Wordsworth Classics edition:

#gcseenglish #gcseenglishliterature #jekyllandhyde
... Read moreClose

Key quote from Jekyll and Hyde  Only in the second last chapter is Mr Hyde finally revealed as being the transformed Dr Jekyll. Here, a revolting (p39) visitor offers Lanyon a choice: either allow the visitor to leave with his potion and not know OR watch the visitor drink the potion and know.  The visitor offers Lanyon the gift of knowledge and, in an echo of Adam and Eves choice, Lanyon accepts it, despite grave misgivings.  This quote is the moment the visitor drinks the potion. He taunts and mocks Lanyon for being so narrow-minded and incurious. The rhythmic tricolon and the imperative behold impart a Biblical tone to the visitors manner. Behold is used 1298 times in the Authorised King James Version of the Bible and 135 times in the 1662 Book of Common Prayer (the versions that Stevenson and his audience would have been familiar with). It is a word then with clear religious connotations.  Coupled with the visitors earlier statement that what Lanyon is about to see will be a prodigy to stagger the unbelief of Satan (p40) and blasphemous annotations found in a pious work (p34), we realise that this visitor is not just taunting Lanyon, he is taunting God.  Lanyon reveals at the end of the chapter what most readers have already deduced; the visitor is none other than Mr Hyde and, after taking the potions, he is transformed into Dr Jekyll. Finally, we know for sure who Mr Hyde really is.  Page reference from the Wordsworth Classics edition: https://amzn.to/3cPGNgl  #gcseenglish #gcseenglishliterature #jekyllandhyde
1 week ago
GCSE English.uk

Got an GCSE English Language exam coming up? Register now for the Jan 2022 webinar series focusing on AQA Paper 1 and 2 unseen reading: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/…

For only £6 per session, payable termly.

Here is a taster video of some of the webinar content - a continuing interpretation of an unseen fiction extract from the June 2017 Paper 1 exam.

Each full-length webinar will include:
• an exam style reading task
• guided answer planning
• model answer openings
• shared answer writing exercise
• top tips on exam technique and what the examiners are looking for
• questions from participants answered
• key vocabulary and terminology
• a timed homework task (note: homework is not marked)

Check back over the coming months for more taster videos on GCSE English Language unseen reading and other exam topics.

#gcseenglish #gcseenglishlanguage #aqa
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My son is extremely happy with Edward's teaching methods and looks forward to his lessons every week. He is very knowledgable, reassuring and structures the lesson in a focused manner providing advice and constructive feedback. Edward demonstrates genuine care and understanding towards his students which has helped boost my sons confidence and performance. My son went from a 6 to a predicted 8 within 3 months of once a week tutoring. I would 100% recommend him!... Read moreClose

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Finding a tutor that my reluctant 15 year old son would be happy to do extra English work for was a tall order. But in Edward he found encouragement and structure that sparked an interest and gave his confidence a massive boost. His writing and analysis are much improved as are his grades. No exam in the end due to COVID-19 but that made all the work put in earlier in the year much more worthwhile. Thanks Edward - you made a huge, lasting difference.... Read moreClose

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I am a GCSE student and fell in the dark abyss of the low marks with no ladder to climb. Luckily, with Edward's help and his very structured lesson as he always planned ahead to ensure that I reach my highest potentialI managed to find a way out of the abyss. By the end of our sessions my grades were at an 8/9 standard, originally commencing at the low 4s. I highly recommend Edward as he has helped me to achieve the grade wanted and shot my confidence up!... Read moreClose

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Edward has been a great help. His structured way of teaching language has been easy to understand and follow. It has been balanced with the right amount of critique and encouragement. The techniques taught can be used to answer questions in a variety of language based topics for the longer questions as well. Our son has gone from a grade 5 to a grade 8 which I did not think was possible. His confidence has shot up! I would highly recommend Edward.... Read moreClose

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My son has just passed both language and literature thanks to Edward’s great tuition. My son was only at level 2 at the start of year 10 and he has not only just passed both exams but has grown in confidence in his own ability in English. Thanks Edward!... Read moreClose

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An excellent tutor. In 6 months he helped my son secure two 8 grades in Eng Lang and Eng Lit even though English was my mathsy son’s least favourite subject. Edward helped my son hit the mark scheme and understand what the examiners were looking for. The tuition sessions increased my son’s confidence in his writing to the extent that he decided to take AS Economics as one of his subjects.... Read moreClose

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About Me

Qualifications

PGCE (Sussex) leading to QTS in Secondary English teaching. BA (Hons) in English Literature from the University of Cambridge.

Experience

Over a decade of classroom teaching experience in the UK and overseas. Over a decade of experience as a tutor. Tutoring online since 2016. Clean enhanced DBS disclosure.

Skills

Skilled at helping reluctant writers develop writing confidence. Excellent track record with STEM minded students, working to help them find a way to understand GCSE English in a more systematic manner.

1:1 Tuition

Personalised 1:1 Lessons

High quality, personalised online learning using Skype and Google Classroom. Lessons can include: homework feedback, reading comprehension, essay practice, timed writing practice, poetry analysis. Homework set after every lesson. Prices from £70 GBP per session.

Regular Writing

Focus on timed exam-style writing, both in lessons and as homework. Direct instruction and generous encouragement to help students overcome bad writing habits and build on their writing strengths.

Exemplars

Large stock of model written work to help students fully understand, and emulate, what a good text looks and feels like. Exemplars are aspirational, challenging and, crucially, designed to please the examiner.

Assessment

Written work assessed weekly using exam board mark schemes and assessment objectives. Exam board jargon explained and grade boundaries demystified. Precise advice given on how to improve.

Contact

Contact me now to enquire about webinar availability.
(Please note that 1:1 tuition is currently fully booked until September 2022.)